Team LifeSaving

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Egypt’s youth is ongoing a personal revolution between tradition and creating their own identity.  Most of the youth has turned towards the internet as tool to facilitate organization and empowerment of their communities; others go online for leisure and entertainment. The influence from western culture, nevertheless, is evident. More and more, Egypt’s youth is picking up on the culture norms and practices that are found in America or Europe and incorporating them into their daily lives. This includes the use of social media sites, entertainment, personal independence, and being more “open-minded.”

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Source: http://transformegypt.com/give/cleanwater

            Therefore, because of the technology and political revolution happening right now within this young group, the brand identity/story fits perfectly. The name itself is so powerful and vibrant (LIFESAVER bottle). So much synergy is found between the website and this youth group. The visual design, first of all, is inviting and invigorating. This is important to this young group because not only does it fit with the brand, but also the emotions they are experiencing at the moment (EE Ch. 6, 284). This youth group is fighting for their rights and seeking outlets of energy and help to push through this struggle. Again, both are fighting for a positive cause and both are open to receive outside help.

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Source: http://transformegypt.com/give/cleanwater

            For the young individuals utilizing the internet for entertainment purposes, the positioning of the product still remains strong. Much like their fellow comrades, they, too, are seeking for hope, a light at the end of the tunnel; a humanitarian company to help ease their troubles and enable further growth of their communities.

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Source: http://transformegypt.com/give/cleanwater

            Furthermore, the site allows for easy communication between LIFESAVER and their customers. The content is tailored for a philanthropic youth group like Egypt’s and allows for interaction and participation. (EE Ch. 6, 285). In other words, Egypt’s youth can help them self, their country, and supports other in need around the world, too.

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Water Crises In Egypt

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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halo_2

Remember late 2004? How can one forget? Fidel Castro banned U.S. dollar transactions in Cuba, Bungie released its extremely popular first-person shooter video game, Halo 2, and War in Iraq was spreading like wildfire in the Middle East. However, something more terrifying was awaiting in the depths of the Indian Ocean. On the morning of December 26th, many countries surrounding the Indian Ocean stood face to face with the most devastating tsunami in human history. Image

Source: http://groundviews.org/2009/12/26/better-governance-the-biggest-lesson-of-2004-tsunami/

 Thousands died, many more injured. Michael Pritchard, an innovator and philanthropist, saw the terrifying damages caused by the natural disaster and felt the need to act; thus, erected the LIFESAVER bottle.

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The LIFESAVER bottle is the world’s first water bottle to convert contaminated water into safe, sterile drinking water. The bottle contains microscopic filters that “catch” potentially harming bacteria, viruses, cysts, parasites, fungi, and any other water borne pathogens. More fascinating is the bottle does this without the aid of any chemicals or UV light. Here is a demonstration of the LIFESAVER bottle by the creator, Michael Pritchard:

So, why is this important you might ask? Well, aside from the groundbreaking innovation that could potentially save millions worldwide, actions still must be taken to make such resources readily available to those in need. The entire nation of Egypt, not just its youth, has been undergoing a water crisis for the past few years. This is a prime example and potential target to utilize the LIFESAVER bottle. The scarcity of water in this country is severe. Egyptian farmers have become desperate and even resorted to using contaminated sewage water to irrigate their crops. Imagine all the harm that would come from eating food grown by such water. No one would be safe, illness doesn’t have a specific target; young, old, brown, white, the damages could be catastrophic. Take into consideration the population explosion occurring in present day Egypt. The rapid population increase adds further stress to the limited supply of clean water for consumption and irrigation. Within a decade, if no substantial action is taken, the clean water supply will run dry. To add to that horror, there is massive pollution occurring in the nation, as well. Industrial waste, agriculture runoffs, and municipal sewage are carelessly being deposited into the Nile River. Toxic waste, pesticides, herbicides, muck pollute the river and render it unfit for any use by any form of life.

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Source: http://www.ecomena.org/egypt-water/

Again, we, humans, have the tools necessary . . . now it’s just a matter of taking action.

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Here is a site if one is seeking to take further action towards the cause: http://transformegypt.com/give/cleanwater

Contemporary Egyptian Youth Pop-Culture

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Identity is about having a sense of belonging; it has to do with commonalities and differences with one another; it is about the principles we share and contradict with our ancestors. Identity gives one a sense of placement, the stability necessary for an individual to feel visible. Egyptian youth is undergoing an identity crisis. There is a struggle between tradition and modernity in contemporary Egyptian youth. This leads to confusion within the youth of their traditions and distorts what makes up popular culture today.

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A lot of this blurring can be directed to the increasing availability of the Internet and social media (Facebook, YouTube, Twitter). The Internet has become the major platform in Egypt’s youth today: from how they express themselves to entertainment. Take, for example, the revolution going on as we speak. The youth is using this commodity to counter Egypt’s security forces and enhance, exponentially, their communication. The power of the Internet and social media within the youth’s fingertips was growing so fast, so quickly the President of the Egypt had to shut it down in fear of more riots and uprisings. When not concerning of revolutionary war, most of Egypt’s youth uses the Internet to interact and establish relationships with the opposite sex.

Mideast Egypt

Television is another form of entertainment highly used in Egypt’s pop-culture. Egyptian television is the most watched media, not only Egyptian youth, but in all of Arab culture. Egyptian cinema is also leader within its region; its annual Cairo International Film Festival is a great example of that (initiated in 1976). The increase in popularity is so great from the youth, it has surpassed revenues from Egyptian films (50 million) compared to American or Western films (10 million).

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 Egyptian music has also taken a swift turn in modern times. Music in Egypt has always been a vital part of its culture. However, since the beginning of the 20th century, western traits have been incorporated into Egyptian music (instruments like the piano and violin). Most of the 20th century, classical pop music held the title for most popular musical genre. Here is an example from this era’s most popular classical singer, Um Kulthoum. However, contemporary Egyptian pop music have since taken the throne, especially in the eyes of its youth. Here is example of a pop song beloved in Egypt by its youth.

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It’s evident globalization is highly impacting Egyptian culture, particularly its youth. Technology has opened the youngster eyes to the world and have since began to integrate characteristics from all parts of the world to formulate their own version of their identity. How ever misplaced it may be, social media is playing a major role in these young individuals daily lives and are using it to shape their own popular culture.

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Egyptian Youth Identity

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A lot of Egypt’s youth is impoverished. Nearly twenty-five percent of Egyptians are of youth and half of them of very poor; this twenty-five percent constitutes for roughly twenty million people between the ages of eighteen and twenty-nine. Studies have, furthermore, shown over fifty percent of Egypt’s youth contributed to the labor force. Of that fifty percent, roughly seventy-five percent were males and twenty-five were percent females. On a similar note, young females in Egypt incorporate about forty-five percent while the males close to twenty percent; however, both gender unemployment rate add up to roughly twenty-five percent (Central Agency for Public Mobilization and Statistics).

            Additionally, reports show fifty-one percent of females with a university degree are unemployed. The rates are higher with females with a degree from a technical vocational school, fifty-six percent, and general vocational school degree, sixty-five percent. Lastly, the youth gender is almost broken down evenly between males and females in Egypt (fifty-one percent male and forty-nine percent female) [CAPMAS].

            What’s more compelling is the struggle between tradition and modern values within contemporary youth society. On one side, a significant number of young Egyptians are more than willing to adapt “western” tradition and lifestyles like online social media, different musical instruments/styles, and sports. On the other hand, many young Egyptians reject this type of lifestyles and favor traditional values and customs that have been set for by their ancestors for generations; traditions like: following Islam, honoring family before anything, and proper etiquette. There is, however, a large number of young people who adopt both lifestyles and thus, highly criticized by the public as being inconsistent or contradictory. There is huge identity crisis in Egypt’s youth today and this is particularly important considering youth in this county makes up for a large percent of its population and are its most important capital.  

 

Sources: http://www.egyptindependent.com/news/youth-are-quarter-egypt-s-population-and-half-them-are-poor

Viva La Revolucion!

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            Some countries have a huge percentage of their population under the age of twenty nine. Other countries, the majority of their younger population is of lower-income or social status (the latter being much more sad and unfair).

            What’s interesting and, somewhat, unfortunate about Upper Egypt’s youth culture is it incorporates both of these actualities. Over sixty percent of Upper Egypt’s youth is between the ages of fifteen to twenty nine years of age and will continue to grow over the next decade; nearly thirty percent of Egypt’s population in under the age of twenty-nine. This is, nevertheless, a clear opportunity for higher proportions of productivity, innovation, and consumption; however, with the overall high unemployment rates, it is evident the county has yet to benefit from it. 

            In spite of the major socio-economic gap between the rich minority and the poor majority, Egyptians took the streets by storm and demanded the then President Hosni Mubarak and his government to be removed, a couple of years ago. This revolt was a result of years of frustration over poverty and exclusion from social, economic, and political opportunity.

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            Youth played a leading, central role in the revolution demanding political change. Across all of Egypt, youth initiated organization to protect their societies and break down the very system that has them feeling invisible and politically minimal. However, despite the increasing cynicism towards their government, Egypt’s youth still relies heavily on its central regime to solve social and economic problems. Surpassing this notion of dependency is the most important task Egypt faces today, particularly for its next generation that has been longing for it for so long. The youth of Egypt has clearly stated their presence in society and expressed their aspirations for higher engagement; it is now up to Egyptian society to respond.  

Imagehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqqAE4sxyrI

 

Source: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2012/08/06/000333038_20120806011445/Rendered/INDEX/716740ESW00PUB0ast0version0June013t.txt